Which of these apply to you?

    You Need a Will Based Estate Plan

    Arizona Estate Planning - Contact Neal Law Firm

    Estate plan design meeting with Arizona attorney Abigail Neal

    Custom Will Based Estate Plan Documents

    Last Will and Testament

    • Make a plan to distribute assets
    • Name a guardian for minor children
    • Specify who should administer your estate

    General Durable Power of Attorney

    • Name who should handle your financial and other affairs if you cannot

    Health Care Power of Attorney

    • Name who should make your health care decisions if you are unable
    • Must include a mental health care powers

    HIPAA Authorization

    • Authorize your health care agent to access your confidential health care information

    Living Will (if desired)

    • Specify end of life medical choices

    Estate Plan Action Items

    • Specific instructions for beneficiary designations and other updates

    Estate Organizer

    Estate plan signing meeting with attorney Abigail Neal

    Estate plan binder

    PDF copies of all signed documents (via email)

    You Need a Trust Based Estate Plan

    Arizona Estate Planning - Contact Neal Law Firm

    Estate plan design meeting with Arizona attorney Abigail Neal

    Custom Trust Based Estate Plan Documents

    Revocable Living Trust

    • Distributed to your beneficiaries when and how you want
    • Protect assets left to beneficiaries from creditors, predators and divorce
    • Keep your estate private and avoid probate
    • Streamline estate administration

    Certificate of Trust

    • Summary of important trust provisions that you can give to the bank, your insurance agent or financial advisor

    Pour Over Will (Last Will and Testament)

    • Name a guardian for minor children
    • Specify who should administer your estate (if a probate is necessary)

    General Durable Power of Attorney

    • Name who should handle your financial and other affairs if you cannot

    Health Care Power of Attorney

    • Name who should make your health care decisions if you are unable
    • Must include a mental health care powers

    HIPAA Authorization

    • Authorize your health care agent to access your confidential health care information

    Living Will (if desired)

    • Specify end of life medical choices

    Estate Plan Action Items

    • Specific instructions for beneficiary designations and other updates

    Trust Funding Instructions

    • Instructions about using your trust to avoid probate

    Estate Organizer

    Estate plan signing meeting with attorney Abigail Neal

    Estate plan binder

    PDF copies of all signed documents on USB flash drive

    2 year estate plan checkup appointment

    Consider This...

    If you have children under 18, it’s important to name a Guardian who will care for your children if you pass away. In Arizona, you name a guardian as part of your Last Will and Testament.

    Learn more:

    Name a Guardian for Your Children

    What Is a Will?

    Consider This...

    After passing, you can transfer your home to your heirs without needing to go to court. You can do this by preparing a Beneficiary Deed or transferring your home to your Revocable Living Trust.

    Learn more:

    Arizona Beneficiary Deeds

    Revocable Living Trusts – The Basics

    Consider This...

    You can name who should make your health care decision if you are unable in a Health Care Power of Attorney. You may also want to create a Living Will to state your wishes about life support in terminal or end of life situations.

    Learn more:

    Healthcare Power of Attorney

    Living Wills

    Consider This...

    Typically, beneficiaries will receive their entire inheritance if they are age 18 or over. But, once they receive it, it’s impossible to make sure it’s spent appropriately. In a Revocable Living Trust, you can state when, how, for what purposes and under what circumstances your beneficiaries will receive their inheritance.

    Learn more:

    Revocable Living Trusts – The Basics

    Consider This...

    It’s important that your business is in the right hands if you are unable to manage it yourself. You can appoint an Agent under a General Durable Power of Attorney to manage your business if you are incapacitated. You can also set out your wishes for your business in a Revocable Living Trust and ensure the right person is handling your business if you are disabled or pass away.

    Learn more:

    Durable Power of Attorney

    Revocable Living Trusts – The Basics

    Consider This...

    Blended families are often in the unique situation of wanting to leave assets to a new spouse, but also to children from a prior relationship. Maintaining family harmony is essential. This requires careful planning, but can be accomplished in a number of ways including beneficiary designations or a Revocable Living Trust.

    Learn more:

    Revocable Living Trusts – The Basics

    Consider This...

    Probate is the court proceeding that often occurs after a person passes. But your loved ones don’t have to go to court! You can avoid probate by using a Revocable Living Trust, designating beneficiaries on accounts or property, or even joint ownership (for married couples). A Trust can keep your affairs private while often streamlining the administration of your estate.

    Learn more:

    Avoid Probate With Trust Funding

    3 Easy Ways to Avoid Probate

    Consider This...

    If you are disabled and unable to handle your affairs or make decisions, you can appoint someone to help. In a Health Care Power of Attorney, you can name the person you should make your health care decisions. In a General Durable Power of Attorney, you can specify the person who should handle your financial and other affairs if you cannot do so yourself.

    Learn more:

    Powers of Attorney & Healthcare Directives

    Consider This...

    The funds you leave to your beneficiaries should be used by your beneficiaries, not taken away by someone else. With a Revocable Living Trust, you can protect those funds from your beneficiary’s creditors, predators and con artists, and their divorcing ex-spouses. You can also protect assets for your children if your surviving spouse gets remarried…

    Ready to Get Started?

    Every person’s situation is unique and deserves thoughtful, deliberate planning. We would be honored to help you with yours. To get started, please complete the form below or call us at 480-699-7992 to schedule your free estate planning consultation.

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